Dictionary of the Renaissance

Dictionary of the Renaissance

Harry E. Wedeck, Frederick M. Schweitzer

$17.99

  • Description
  • Author
  • Info
  • Reviews

Description

This A-to-Z reference offers a survey of Renaissance personalities, innovations, and other terminologies with an in-depth introduction about the period.

By the fourteenth century, Italian society bore little resemblance to that of the feudal age. Merchants and financiers were establishing a new social order with greater freedom than their counterparts north of the Alps. This meant that cultural transformations would first flourish in Italy and later be carried to the rest of the continent.

Dictionary of the Renaissance is a comprehensive reference guide to the period, including informative entries about major artists and other important figures, significant events and locations, and other key terms and concepts associated with the Renaissance. The introduction provides a historic overview of the cultural, political, economic, and scientific transformations that occurred in Italy between the fourteenth and seventeenth centuries.


Author

Harry E. Wedeck:
Harry E. Wedeck was a linguistic scholar of the classics, an observer of spheres beyond the norm, and a practicing witch. A native of Sheffield, England, Wedeck was chairman of the department of classical languages at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn from 1935 to 1950 and then taught the classics at Brooklyn College until 1968. Afterward, he lectured on medieval studies at the New School for Social Research until 1974. Some of his excursions into the unusual remain available in reprint editions. They include Dictionary of Astrology, Dictionary of Aphrodisiacs, A Treasury of Witchcraft, and The Triumph of Satan.|||Harry E. Wedeck was a linguistic scholar of the classics, an observer of spheres beyond the norm, and a practicing witch. A native of Sheffield, England, Wedeck was chairman of the department of classical languages at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn from 1935 to 1950 and then taught the classics at Brooklyn College until 1968. Afterward, he lectured on medieval studies at the New School for Social Research until 1974. Some of his excursions into the unusual remain available in reprint editions. They include Dictionary of Astrology, Dictionary of Aphrodisiacs, A Treasury of Witchcraft, and The Triumph of Satan.

Info

Reviews